Dry soil impacts lake inflows

Runoff forecast grim, but lake level good thanks to good planning, Croft says

Careful management has allowed Big Horn Lake – still solidly frozen at Horseshoe Bend on Tuesday -- to remain relatively high in elevation this winter in anticipation of a low runoff year. David Peck photo

Careful management has allowed Big Horn Lake – still solidly frozen at Horseshoe Bend on Tuesday — to remain relatively high in elevation this winter in anticipation of a low runoff year. David Peck photo

Don’t be fooled by all of that snow in your yard and glistening in the mountains. It’s dry underneath that snow in most of Wyoming’s high country, and that could result in a lower-than-average runoff this spring and summer, Friends of Bighorn Lake President Bob Croft said this week.

An announcement by the Bureau of Reclamation that inflow into Big Horn Lake during the April-through-July runoff period is forecast to be only 67 percent of average is not surprising given the soil conditions, Croft said in an interview Tuesday.

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